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Witchvox Article: The Primordial Image: Archetypes

Scott K

We all need something to kick start our brains in the morning. I don't know why I chose to tackle this article. I don't believe in coincidence -in the sense of complete randomness without connection- but now my little hamsters are going a mile a minute. Reaches for more coffee...

The Primordial Image: Archetypes

Author: Vikki Bramshaw
Posted: December 20th. 2009

"A ’standard description’ of an archetype (as a concept) is: ‘Archetypes are deep enduring patterns of thought and behavior laid down in the human psyche, which remain powerful over long periods of time and transcend cultures and generations. Archetypes form the basis of instinctive patters of behavior that all of humankind shares in common.’


Most people know the common Archetypes (the ‘fundamental personalities’) : such as The Mother, The Hero, The Tyrant, The Lovers, The Child, and so on. But like many other terms which have been adopted by modern western spiritual paths (such as the concept of ‘Karma’) the Archetype is a much more expansive subject than it is usually given credit for.

On considering what the term Archetype can really offer when it is applied to Wicca and Initiatory Craft, we need to first look at what the pioneering psychologist Carl Jung really meant when he coined the term, ‘Archetype’. When Jung first came up with the concept, he named what we now call the ‘Archetype’ the Primordial Image, a phrase that he first used in his essay, ‘Instinct and the Unconscious’. 

When he started his ‘modern quest for the soul’, Jung turned to classical mythology to explain his insights - because he realized that the stories within the mythology explained his concept quite nicely as reflections of the human experience – together with other ‘gateways to the unconscious’ such as dreams, rituals, and the use of art and symbols. In this way, he identified the power of mythology as (what could be described as) both a ‘key’ and a ‘mirror’ for the journey of the soul."

Witchvox Article.

Enjoy.

Scott

 

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